Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Batik at Tembi, Yogyakarta

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

One of Tatang Elmy Wibowo’s batik artworks at his gallery.

Batik at Tembi, with Tatang

After the busy dusty dirty streets of Jakarta, it was pure relief to arrive in Tembi, South Yogyakarta, with its bright green rice fields, banana trees, ginger and coconut palms.
I couldn’t resist returning to the village of Tembi, it was where I first met Tatang and visited his group of batik artists last year, during my Scholarship trip. I wanted to meet up with them all again and see their new work, this time with Richard.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

With Tatang outside his Gallery.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Aprat Koeswadji with new work drying outside his studio. It was great to see him again and meet his brothers, also batik artists.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Mrs Yati, Tatang and Mrs Arminah, batik artists and friends.

Tembi Rumah Budaya

We stayed in Tembi Rumah Budaya, or ‘Tembi Cultural Home’, in a traditional style bungalow surrounded by rice and peanut fields. Everyday agricultural workers tended the land by hand, weeding, harvesting peanuts or planting rice for the rainy season. It was a really lovely place to stay and incredible value, at £30 a night it included breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea with cake and dinner, which I hadn’t known about when making the booking, such good luck !

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Tembi Rumah Budaya bungalows.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Our bungalow, last on the right near the Ampitheatre entrance.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

View from outside our bungalow porch.

 

Soon after our arrival we were greeted by Tatang to discuss our week ahead. We planned to visit batik villages, wood carvers,  Parang machete makers, cap printing workshops and cap makers, batik artists and puppet makers, all with Tatang as our fabulous cultural arts tour guide.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Sili, Javanese folk singer and instrumentalist partner. A wonderful night !

Tembi Rumah Budaya has its own small Museum of culture and a music forum allowing students to study and play Gamelan and other musical instruments. On our first night we were invited to a concert of Javanese folk usic in the amphitheatre at the back of the grounds. The female singer sounded melodiously beautiful, her voice crystal clear, full of quivering harmonies and expression. It was a real treat and we only had a few steps to our bungalow afterwards. The next night there were several singing groups from Sulawesi, Borneo, Malaysia and Java, playing in a mixture of styles, some quite theatrical and dramatic.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

The young Indonesian violinist was amazingly good and the sound of the guitarist and vocalist blended beautifully.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

A dramatic mix of music and poetry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Batik making

Many of the villages in this this region of Bantul including Tembi are known for their batik making, each specialising in its own distinctive style. The creative skills of ordinary and often poor people are breathtaking, exquisite Tulis designs delicately flow across the cloth, all hand drawn in wax with a canting.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Fine Tulis canting work by Mrs Yati.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

A group of women applying second and third layers of wax to their once dyed batik works.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

One of the ladies working for Tatang, on a scarf that I bought at the end of my stay. Surprisingly she didn’t use a support, working directly on her lap.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Two of Tatang’s expert batik workers.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Detail of the intricate motifs of this batik worker.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Village women batiking communally outside Tembi.

The women generally work in rudimentary conditions; a low stool on a concrete floor, a bamboo stand to drape the cotton over, a kerosene burner to heat the aluminium bowl containing the wax and various sized cantings filling a rusty tin. Their manner is serene while they work almost instinctively, “drawing” repeated designs with wax onto the length of cotton.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Starting my batik the Javanese way, in Tatang’s workshop, Tembi.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Blowing the spout of the canting to reduce flow initially.

 

I spent two days with some ladies working on my own batik at Tatang’s workshop, it was a real privilege. Sitting on a small stool all day was challenging enough, but to keep a steady and constant hand while applying wax to draped, un taut cotton was very difficult ! Batiking the traditional Javanese way is all together different and much more demanding than our contemporary methods in the UK. It’s about precision and accuracy, calm application with an even flow of wax and no drips allowed.

As I only had 2 days to make this 2 metre batik cloth I decided to mix abstract and traditional motifs to make faster progress. It was hot work but pleasantly therapeutic with the chatter of people around me, the regular Muezzin call to Prayer and the distant Gamelan playing.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Waxing the areas of green I want protected from the next blue dye.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Detail of batik dyed green

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Tatang dyeing the batik in blue Naphthol dye. It appears a pale yellow before the chemical reaction.

 

 

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

My batik after the blue dye has been through the acid water. Instantly blue, like magic.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Water boiling in a heavy iron pot ready for the de-waxing process.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

My batik de-waxed in 5 minutes, by dipping into boiling water a few times, melting the wax out.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Section of my completed batik made in Tatang’s studio workshop, the traditional way.

I was able to complete my batik in time, dyeing it with green and blue Naphthol dyes, with the help of Tatang, who did all the chemical work for me. Naphthol dyes are banned in Europe, UK and the USA because of their toxicity and danger to the environment. It is a shame we don’t have a safe version of, or similar dye to Naphthol because of their instant colourfastness and ability to be boiled without losing any colour depth. As soon as my batik had its final blue dye, still wet, it was dipped into a pot of boiling water to remove the wax, all done in 5 minutes ! It would have taken me at least a day of ironing through newspaper at home with my Procion cold water dyes, and wax residue would still remain.

Mufidah

On our way to a cap making workshop we popped in to see Mufida’s natural dye studio set in a picturesque rural area outside Tembi, it was good to see her again and admire her beautiful batik work.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Richard and Tatang watching Mufidah dye her batik in natural Mahogany dye.

 

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Mufidah dyeing her batik in natural mahogany dye.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Beautiful banana and coconut trees outside Mufidah’s workshop.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

A selection of completed batiks by Mufidah, bottom three and three top left.

Cap making
We visited a cap making workshop and saw the lengthy and skilful process of cap construction, where copper strips are carefully bent into shapes and soldiered onto a framework, creating intricate patterns to print hot wax onto cotton. This home industry was hidden in a small village, down a back lane, a place we would never have found alone.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

A cap in the making; copper strips are bent into shapes with small pliers.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Work table with copper canting in progress. The drawn out design is behind. I will write a more detailed post next time as I am having one made to my design.

Cap printing

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Cap printing by Rahmad.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Rahmad printing a different cap design using a large cap, very skilful.

The next day Tatang took me to a friend’s cap stamping workshop to have a go at the cap printing process myself. I expected to have a few basic lessons first, but was ‘thrown in the deep end’. A two metre length of cotton was smoothed onto the printing pad, my instructor Rahmad folded it diagonanlly across one end to make a crease, then I was told to follow the fold with my cap. It was really quite difficult to keep the edge straight as well as lining up the cap design to repeat neatly.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Trying to keep a straight line with the border design.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Oops, did I go off line ?

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Rahmad helping me to print the border straight.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Hot work, the cap is quite heavy and not easy to print in the right place !

Batik travels

Rahmad’s daughters playing in the workshop while he works.

Standing directly by the hot burner the heat was overwhelming, making my task even more challenging, but I did manage to fill my fabric with a Parang motif. I Really have to admire the skill and speed at which Rahmad and the other craftsmen work, never making a blotch, the repeated motif never out of line or offset, they show such expertise.

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Kawung cap design being printed a second time with resin based wax. It is perfectly aligned and done at amazing speed without drips.

Dyeing the batik

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

My fabric printed with a parang cap design, not perfect but I am pleased.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Tatang rubs green and blue naphthol dyes on to my cap batik.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

My Batik cap printed fabric completed, dyed blue and green with Naphthol dyes.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Parang cap print dyed black. This batik has been de-waxed and will be dyed green with Naphthol dye, to make a green on black parang design.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Black and white cap print being dyed green.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Dyed green, wait for the chemical reaction.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Batik print is dipped into acid water and the chemical reaction makes the red green.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Batik is rinsed to clean off the chemicals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inspirational Batik travels by Marina Elphick, on The Batik Route.

Batik de waxing Javanese style, finished batik is immersed into boiling water and the wax instantly melts off. The batik is then washed in soapy water and all completed in 5-10 minutes !

Our days continued with visits to shadow puppet makers, a stone mason, a blacksmith and his wife, who forged a Parang machete for Richard. When he received it three days later the wooden handle had been beautifully carved into a dragon’s head.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Husband and wife hammer at the steel blade to be, forging it into a curved Parang.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

A knife similar to Richard’s, only straight, called a Golok.

It seems the whole region is populated by highly accomplished and creative people, all proud of their hand making skills. It was a genuine treat to meet and talk with these resourceful craftsmen and women. It has been a fascinating privilege to be able to watch the different time consuming processes of their work and see the results.
All thanks to Tatang, a talented artist himself who knows a whole range of interesting experts, artists and makers in and around Tembi.

Batik travel adventures, by Marina on the Batik Route.

Batik by Widayani Koeswadji on exhibition at Leksa Ganesha.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

The Flooded Village of kampong Phluck

We had a very special day visiting the amazing and surreal village of Kampong Phluck.

Inspirational travel, Marina Elphick on the Batik Route.

Houses on stilts in kampong Phluck, the flooded village on the edge of Ton Le Sap lake, Cambodia

We travelled by boat towards Asia’s largest fresh water lake, Tonle Sap, on the way seeing young men and boys fishing in the muddy canal waters. Two women and their babies came on to our boat, with bags of raw meat to sell direct to the villagers of Kampong Phluck. We were asked first if it was okay, because these young women could not afford to pay for their own boat.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Young Fisherman on the canal.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Our motor boat on the canal to Kampong Phluck.

The canal was long and gradually widened as the flood waters merged the land into a vast lake, tree tops like floating bushes. How the boat driver knew where the canal route was I don’t know, but he steered us safely.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Farmer working his land along side the canal.

Inspirational travel, Marina Elphick on the Batik Route.

Young people fishing on the flooded canal, handbag an all !


Inspirational travel, Marina Elphick on the Batik Route.

Men fishing from a tree in the flooded landscape near the village

Eventually we came out into what looked like an open sea, no sign of any land ahead, only the odd fishing boat in the far distance and a lady selling refreshments from her canoe. I bought chopped mango for us and 25 packets of small biscuits to give out to the village children. We turned back towards the flooded landscape and came to a small cafe on stilts at the edge of the lake, where a picnic lunch was waiting for us.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Taking a break for lunch, Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Canoeing to Kampong Phluck.

A Cambodian lady at the cafe offered us a canoe ride into the village, where motor boats couldn’t go. Carefully we climbed down onto a very shallow canoe and sat crossed legged as we were steered through the flooded forest. Our boat woman knew her way and zig zagged our small vessel through the roots and trees smoothly to the Village of Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Canoeing to Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Canoeing to Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Children arriving for their snacks.

As we approached children appeared climbing out of their homes, scrambling down ladders, towards us skipping on to boats or swimming amongst the stilt poles, eagerly awaiting their treats.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Children learn to climb and swim young in Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Children so young sailing canoes.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Boys sail to meet us.

It was heart wrenching to see these tiny children living so perilously yet they seemed agile, confident and happy. They bowed with gratitude as they received their snacks then scattered away.
Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

A family home in Kampong Phluck.

All houses were high up on 6 metre stilts to avoid the monsoon flooding. In the rainy season it appears like a floating village, in the dry season dwellings are perched precariously on skeletal poles high above dry land.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

The “back streets” Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

A lady selling groceries direct to homes of villagers, Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Mother and baby, Kampong Phluck.

The people are very poor and their daily lives focus on survival. All food other than fish and the few leaves grown in floating ‘nurseries’ had to come from the market on the mainland, one hour up the canal on a motor boat.

Inspirational travel, Marina Elphick on the Batik Route.

Home on water, in the rainy season the water would reach almost floor level.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

The “back streets” Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Home made completely out of bamboo, Palm leaves and wood. Kampong Phluck.

It was astonishing to see how the people lived and coped with family life, existing on so little in such difficult conditions. It was a very humbling insight into the lives of cheerful but vulnerable people.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

The flooded forest of Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

The flooded forest of Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Fishing, Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Villager trading, Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Young fisherman on way to Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Homes and small businesses, Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Villagers trading, Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Villagers trading, Kampong Phluck.

Travel for inspiration, Marina Elphick on The Batik Route.

Passing time, little girl in Kampong Phluck.

Marina's inspirational travel adventure at Banteay Srey Temple

The Temples of Angkor, Cambodia

The truly inspiring Temples of Ankor, Cambodia

In 1860, missionaries came across ruins in the Cambodian jungle—and discovered a lost city twice as large as Manhattan, New York. What an incredible thought, just imagine the exciting feeling of discovering somewhere so special !

Marina on her inspirational travels.

The front of the jungle covered Ta Prohm Temple.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

The front entrance of the amazing Ta Prohm Temple, where nature has taken over.

My trip to Angkor, Cambodia with my husband Richard has been an exciting and amazing discovery for us, finding some Temples still virtually in the same condition as when they were first discovered.

Ta Prohm Temple

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Huge tree engulfing a wall at Ta Prohm Temple, Ankor, Cambodia.

Ta Prohm Temple was built as a Buddhist monastery in the 12th century. It appeared to be the most ruined of all the Temples, visibly being strangled by trees and overgrown with huge creeping vines. The first sight was quite surreal; giant snake-like roots seemingly growing through the stone structures and silently squeezing the life out of them. The way nature has taken over Ta Prohm is spectacular and visually dramatic, but the damage that these strangling vines are causing is serious and has to be closely monitored.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Huge tree pressing down on the Ta Prohm Temple building.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Strangling Vines on Ta Prohm Temple.

 

Marina on her inspirational travels.

The weighty burden of huge trees growing through and over the stone walls of Ta Prohm Temple.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Tree roots visibly creeping through the stone blocks

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Giant trees taking hold of the ruined buildings of Ta Prohm Temple.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Huge tree growing through the stone work of the wonderful Ta Prohm Temple.

Angkor Wat
Our next visit was to the stunning and famous Angkor Wat, built during the reign of King Suryavarman II in the early 12th century. It was first Hindu, later Buddhist and It was constructed following the model of the temple mountain symbolising Mount Meru, home of the Gods.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Angkor Wat Temple, Cambodia, seen from front left.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Angkor Wat Temple seen from front entrance. This was apparently a quieter day than usual, but round the side and back it was deserted, so better for photographs.

From a distance Angkor Wat appears to be a colossal stone building all on one level, with a long causeway leading to the centre, but close up it is a series of elevated towers, covered galleries, chambers, porches and courtyards on different levels linked by stairways.
It is set within a vast square moat, then a forest, after which a long, sand stone causeway leads to the stepped entrance. The outer wall, 1024 by 802 metres and 4.5 m high, is surrounded by a 30 metre border of open ground and a moat 190 metres wide.

Angkor Wat Cambodia.

An aerial view of Angkor Wat, giving an idea of its scale. The walk ways between the forest and the temple are long and the trees are huge tropical species, not little bushes as they could be perceived here. Photo by Wiki Common.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Apsaras Dancers inside Angkor Wat Temple, absolutely stunning carving from 12th Century craftsmen.

Inside, the various chambers walls are covered with stone carvings and bas-reliefs depicting Hindu mythology and the wars the king fought during his reign. Ankor Wat has over 2000 Apsara dancers exquisitely carved throughout the numerous galleries and corridors.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Apsara Dancers , one of over 2000 carvings inside Angkor Wat.

It was easy to become overwhelmed by the scale of Angkor Wat and feel disorientated by the repetitive elements in the architecture; galleries with columns, towers, curved roofs, steps and the cross-shaped plan occur again and again. Good we had our guide, Leda with us, who knew her way around very well and was able to take us to the least busy parts enabling a few photographs without other tourists.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Ankor Wat Temple, West side..

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Angkor Wat Temple, Eastern side. No other Tourists here, great !

Angkor Thom

Angkor Thom was the last capital of the Great Khmer Empire under the reign of Buddhist King Jayavarman VII and it is surrounded by an 8 metre high wall built in a perfect square.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

The ancient South gate and entrance bridge, featuring a row of 54 gods or demons holding the sacred Naga snake.

We entered the city through the ancient South gate, an impressive stone arch carved with elephants and four giant faces. On each side of the entrance path a row of 54 gods and demons held the giant sacred Naga snake, making our approach quite awe inspiring.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

North gate to Angkor Thom. Some heads have obviously been restored.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Detail of Angkor Thom bridge, 54 Gods and Demons hold the sacred Naga snake.

 

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Detail of the entance path and moat or canal behind.

Bayon Temple

Marina on her inspirational travels.

The four faced towers of Bayon Temple, Ankor Thom.

After a cooler walk through a forest we came to Bayon Temple, a 12th century masterpiece known for its 54 towers with enigmatic faces, representing the 54 provinces of the Great Khmer Empire. Each tower had four faces of Buddha facing outwards, and were carved on a monumental scale.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Detail of Tower, Bayon Temple.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Two faces on one of the 54 towers of Bayon Temple, Angkor Thom.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Smiling Buddha at Bayon Temple, Angkor Thom.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

The four faced towers of Bayon Temple, seen from the inside.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

One of the four faces of Buddha , Bayon Temple.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Elephant outside Bayon Temple in the ancient city of Ankor Thom.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Outside the Bayon Temple.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Outside the Temple of Bayon.

Terrace of the Elephants

Nearby were the Terrace of the Elephants and the Terrace of the Leper King. The Terrace of the Elephants is part of the walled city of Angkor Thom, and was used by Angkor’s king Jayavarman VII as a platform from which to view his victorious returning army. It was attached to the palace of Phimeanakas, which has not survived because it was primarily made of wood and organic material.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

The Terrace of the Elephant, Ankor Thom.

The Terrace of the Leper King is at the north end of the Terrace of the Elephant and had some amazingly intricate bas-relief sculpture, including the five headed horse and scenes of warriors and dancers.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

An unfinished secton of the Leper King bas-relief, showing chisel marks where the carving has been roughed out, ready for finer work.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

The Terrace of the Leper King, a favourite king of Ankor Thom in the 12th century who was unfortunately infected with Leprosy.

The Terrace of the Leper King

There are many stories to why the name Leper King, it is said that King Jayavarman VII had leprosy, but this is disputed. The current name derives from a 15th-century sculpture discovered at the site. The statue depicts the Hindu god Yama, the god of death, however was called the “Leper King” because of discolouration and moss growing on it was reminiscent of a person with leprosy. Another explanation is that this statue would represent Yama, the god of the deaths, and the terrace would have been in fact a royal crematorium.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Gods and Goddesses from the Leper King Terrace.

Preah Khan
Preah Khan was another stunning 12th century Buddhist Temple, slightly tumbled down, with nature doing its best to undermine it.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Approach to Preah Khan Temple. This little boy was happily drawing in the sand and was not asking for money.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

A sand drawing made by the local boy.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Portrait of an Apsara dancer, or maybe Shiva, in sand by a Cambodian boy.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

The artist himself.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Entrance to Preah Khan, a 12th Century Temple which served as a religious university.

Preah Khan originally served as a religious university and a temple. The temple is still largely unrestored, the initial clearing was from 1927 to 1932, and partial renovation was carried out in 1939. Since then free-standing statues have been removed for safe-keeping, and there has been further consolidation and restoration work. Throughout, the conservators have attempted to balance restoration and maintenance of the wild condition in which the temple was discovered. They have continued the cautious approach to restoration, believing that to go further would involve too much guesswork, and prefer to respect the ruined nature of the temple.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Long hallway through the central section of Preah Khan.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Tumbled down corridor of Preah Khan.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

A Library inside Preah Khan.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

One of many Hindu Godesses decorating Preah Khan.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

A Stupa in one of Preah Khan’s corridors. The surrounding holes were where decorative bronze panels would have been fixed. Previously there would have been a gold Buddha sitting there but it was stolen by the Khmer Rouge.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Carved Lintel featuring Apsaras dancing.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Detail of decoratively carved Lintel, Preah Khan.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Hindu Bhuddas carved into the interior wall of Preah Khan.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

A walkway out of Preah Khan through the ancient city of Ankor Thom. A damaged sculpture of a 5 headed Naga, a Hindu mythological protector.

Marina on her inspirational travels.

Preah Khan Temple, side gate.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Large tree, known as “Elephant trunk” gripping the wall of Preah Khan.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Detail of the damaging tree on the outer wall of Preah Khan.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Outer wall and back entrance of Preah Khan showing ” Elephant trunk” fom the other side and the damage it is causing.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Exiting Ankor Thom through an ancient gateway.

NeakPean
At the end of our visit to the Grand circuit of Temples we visited the quiet Neak Pean, a Buddhist sanctuary and ancient health spa placed in the centre of an artificial lake.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Walk way across the large artificial lake that surrounds Neak Pean, an ancient spa and health sanctuary.

A few thin trees struggle to survive and sway like reeds in the vast lake which had a narrow walkway for us to walk across.

Walk way across Neak Pean's outer lake.

Walk way across Neak Pean’s outer lake.

The sanctuary was originally designed for medical purposes (the ancients believed that going into these pools would balance the elements in the bather and cure disease); it is one of the many hospitals that Jayavarman VII built and is based on the ancient Hindu belief of balance. Four connected pools represent Water, Earth, Fire and Wind.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Central sacred monument at Neak Pean, an ancient spa and health sanctuary.

Marina's inspirational adventures.

Neak Pean, an ancient spa and health sanctuary.

Banteay Srey
Our final Temple visit was to the exquisitely beautiful Banteay Srey, dedicated to the Hindu God Shiva and considered the best preserved Temple in Cambodia.

Marina's inspirational travel adventure at Banteay Srey Temple

The inner sanctuary of the beautiful pink sandstone temple of Banteay Srey, the 10th century”gem” of Ankor. The Temple is dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva.
It is the best preserved temple in Cambodia.

The 10th century Temple was built in Pink sand stone, which was harder than usual, enabling the fine carving to last for centuries. The buildings themselves were miniature in scale, unusually so when measured by the standards of Angkorian construction.

Marina's inspirational travel adventure at Banteay Srey Temple

Celestial maiden.
Banteay Srey is known as Citadel of Women and has many beautiful bas-relief carvings of divine Devatas, Godessess, celestial maidens and dancing Apsaras embellish the walls.

Marina's inspirational travel adventure at Banteay Srey Temple

Skilled 10th century carving on decorative panels on the inner sanctuary walls.

Banteay Srey is known as “citadel of women,” or “citadel of beauty”, probably related to the intricacy of the bas relief carvings found on the walls and the tiny dimensions of the buildings themselves.

Marina's inspirational travel adventure at Banteay Srey Temple

Monkey God guardians of Banteay Srey Temple, guarding the central shrine.

Marina's inspirational travel adventure at Banteay Srey Temple

Intricately detailed bas-relief showing Shiva sitting on a four headed elephant above Kala on this lintel of the interior of Banteay Srey.

It was a magical place, with numerous intricate carvings of Hindu gods and deities, on pediments columns and lintels. The subtle reds, pinks and orange were heightened by the afternoon sun giving the walls a warm glow.

Marina's inspirational travel adventure at Banteay Srey Temple

The Hindu god Shiva, known at ‘The Destroyer’ sitting above a deity representing death, on this masterful carved lintel.

 

Marina's inspirational travel adventure at Banteay Srey Temple.

Decorative carving in the sandstone column, Banteay Srey.

Marina's inspirational travel adventure at Banteay Srey Temple

A panel showing Kala, a deity representing time and death.

Banteay Srey Temple

A wonderfully carved pediment over the doorway at Banteay Srey, one of several showing Kala, the deity of time and death.

Cambodia is changing fast, a new airport in Siem Reap is being planned for 2016-17, allowing direct international flights. This will step up the number of tourists filing through the ancient Temples of Ankor and will undoubtedly make a less authentic experience in the future.
Cambodia’s people are astounding, they have suffered the trauma of the Khmer Rouge regime but have picked themselves up and moved on, always friendly, helpful and welcoming.
I really admire them and their courage, they have contributed to making our trip truly enjoyable, a travel experience I will never forget.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Batik Artist Thetis Blacker

Thetis Blacker

Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Thetis Blacker working on a batik, using a canting in her studio, at Pasturewood.

I decided to write this post about Thetis and her wonderfully vibrant work, because it is almost a year ago since I travelled out to Indonesia on my Thetis Blacker Scholarship adventure and I am very grateful to her and Temenos for making this opportunity possible.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

The Phoenix, batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

Thetis Blacker created richly coloured, energetic batik paintings notable for their symbolic and visionary qualities; as a distinguished and respected batik artist her batiks were commissioned for churches and cathedrals in the UK, Europe and the United States. In England her most prominent work were sets of banners on themes such as the Creation, resurrection and the Apocalypse, seen at Winchester Cathedral, Durham Cathedral and St George’s Chapel, Windsor. Her subjects were mainly mythological, drawn from Christian, Asian and classical sources, her style was vigorous, clearly articulate and full of colour, like her personality.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

The Creator of Darkness and Light batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Batiks by Thetis Blacker at Winchester cathedral. The Creation series.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Baptism, batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Thetis Blacker working in her studio at Pasturewood.

Ann Thetis Blacker was born on 13th December 1927 at Holmbury St Mary in Surrey. She was the daughter of psychiatrist Carlos Paton Blacker and her grandfather Carlos Blacker was a close friend of Oscar Wilde.
Thetis originally planned a singing career. She studied in London with the lieder-singer Elena Gerhardt, appeared in the chorus at Glyndebourne in the 1950s and sang the role of Mother Goose in Stravinsky’s Rake’s Progress. Despite a promising start, Thetis Blacker felt that her true destiny lay in visual art.

Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and member of The Temenos Academy

Sketch in felt tip by Thetis Blacker.

Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and Fellow of The Temenos Academy

The Healing Tree, screen print by Thetis Blacker.

 

Having decided on her vocation she received painting lessons from Brenda Moore (Mrs Campbell Taylor, who now has artworks in The National Portrait Gallery), and she studied drawing and painting at Chelsea School of Art.
In 1970 Thetis was awarded a Churchill Fellowship, a travel scholarship which enabled her to visit India, Iran, Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia, where she worked at the Batik Research Institute of Yogyakarta. She was very taken by the spirituality and symbolic nature of the batik art she saw there, inspiring a love of this magical and vibrant technique. Thetis later visited Peru and Bali which further inspired her and helped to form her style.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

The Simurgh, batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

Thetis believed in the divine presence in all things and that creative art has a life and soul of its own. She considered inspiration, although part of human experience, to be something that comes from a source other than the human, and was also influenced by her vivid dreams and the mythical power of
animals and ancient spiritual texts.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

The Feng Huang, batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

In 1973 her book A Pilgrimage of Dreams was published, and the poet Kathleen Raine wrote the foreword to it. “ A Pilgrimage of Dreams”, is an anthology of Thetis’s vivid dreams and feature her batik pictures of mythical beasts and birds, such as the phoenix, the griffon or the unicorn. ‘These paintings are not intended to be illustrations in the literal sense, rather they are like punctuation marks, pauses for contemplation’. It was the sacred element in Thetis’s art that endeared it particularly to Kathleen.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

The Phoenix and the Monster of the Deep, batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

The Creation The Third day, creation of Land and vegetation. Batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

Blacker was a close friend of Kathleen and later became a fellow of the Temenos Academy, dedicated to “Education in the Light of the Spirit”. (Temenos was founded by Kathleen Raine, Keith Critchlow, Brian Keeble and Philip Sherrard.)

Initally it was launched as a Journal devoted to the Arts of the Imagination. From these early beginnings The Temenos Academy was established as a teaching organisation dedicated to ‘ the Learning of the Imagination’, where scholars and teachers would be invited to hold study groups and give lectures on this recurring philosophy.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker, from “The Birds who flew beyond Time’.

Over the years Thetis Blacker produced several memorable series of work based on mythical themes. A phoenix rising from the ashes was a favourite subject, a typically fiery example being featured on the altar frontal in St George’s Chapel, Windsor (1997), where a major exhibition of her work was held in 2000.
Thetis had significant commissions; a Phoenix for the dining hall of Grey College Durham; Apocalypse (St Andrew’s House); A Bestiary of Mythical Creatures; The Creation (Winchester Cathedral); Search for the Simurgh; Arbor Cosmica; work for St Albans Abbey, and her last major work, commissioned by Blacker’s dealer Henry Dyson – banners of St Cuthbert and St Oswald for Durham Cathedral (2001). Her work is hung in over 500 private and public collections across the world, clearly she was a prolific and dedicated visionary artist.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Phoenix, batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

In June 2002, Thetis Blacker was awarded an Honary Doctorate by Durham University. Four years later she died at Bramley in Surrey, on 18th December 2006, working right up until the end on her stunning batik artworks.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Phoenix Egg, batik by Thetis Blacker 1981.

Thetis was a member of the Batik Guild and The Temenos Academy has established a biannual award in memory of her, to further the study and research of batik. This award is currently open for applicants for the 2014 scholarship via the Batik Guild and the Temenos Academy.
I will be returning to Java and Bali next month, to study and further research traditional batik methods, motifs and batik tool making. I hope to revitalise my own batik techniques and return with renewed inspiration and ideas.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

One of Thetis’s batiks acquired by Van Mildert College, Durham, hanging in the Anne Dobson Hall.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Batik from “The Birds who flew beyond Time “, batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Artwork from “The Birds who flew beyond Time”, batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

From “The Birds who flew beyond Time”, batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Artwork from “The Birds who flew beyond Time ” batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

The Birds who flew beyond Time, children’s story book by Thetis Blacker.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Owl batik from “The Birds who flew beyond Time “, batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

Batik by Thetis Blacker, UK Batik artist and fellow of The Temenos Academy

Art illustration from “The Birds who flew beyond Time”, batik on cotton by Thetis Blacker.

Batik by Marina Elphick, Uk artist specialising in batik art.

A Portrait of Tania

Batik by Marina Elphick, a recognised contemporary batik artist from the UK, specialising in Portraits.

Tania, butterflies and flowers in blue. A batik portrait of my lovely little sister.

A portrait of Tania in batik

This is a special portrait of my sister and it took me a long time to prepare and create. The likeness is taken from different times in her life, working from many photos covering about twenty years.
Tania’s favourite colour was blue and that was the starting point for my batik portrait of her.

Pencil drawings by Marina Elphick,  respected portrait artist.

Sketching from photographs of Tania.

Initially it involved looking through lots of photographs, then making sketches and drawings, until I came up with one I was happy with.

Pencil drawing by Marina Elphick, who captures a realistic likeness of her model.

Pencil drawing of Tania in progress. (2)

Pencil drawing by Marina Elphick, who captures a realistic likeness of her model.

Pencil drawing of Tania in progress. (3)

Pencil drawing by Marina Elphick, who captures a realistic likeness of her model.

Tania, pencil drawing, by Marina.

A portrait in pencil by artist Marina Elphick, who works with batik to create realistic portraits. Portrait artist Elphick works in various media, her most unusual, batik.

Drawing of Tania for batik portrait. Pencil on Cotton.

Next I gathered inspiration from nature; flowers, butterflies and traditional batik symbology. Many batik motifs are imbued with meaning and have spiritual resonance, reflecting the culture of a deeply philosophical people.

During my trip to Java, Indonesia last year I felt I took Tania with me in ‘spirit’ and now I associate some of the Indonesian batik designs and motifs with her. I have included Kawung and Ceplok motifs as well as the Garuda wings of the Sawat motif which I have interpreted in various ways.

Portraits by Marina Elphick.

Colour sketch in watercolour for batik portrait.

Portraits by Marina Elphick.

Watercolour sketch for Portrait.

Batik by Marina Elphick, a recognised contemporary batik artist from the UK, specialising in Portraits.

Completed batik portrait of Tania, my dear little sister, by Marina Elphick.

I wanted the portrait to express Tania’s warm loving nature so I used flowers in a symbolic way, finding her blue favourites poignantly true of her character: humility, loyalty and love, from bluebells, cornflowers and forget-me-nots. Aquilegias are associated with innocence, folly and desertion in love and in Greek mythology the iris is the link between Earth and Heaven.

The Goddess Iris guided women to heaven, her upright petals symbolising strength, faith and wisdom.

Batik by Marina Elphick, Uk artist specialising in batik art.

Blue was Tania’s favourite colour, here are Aquilegia, cornflowers, bluebells and forget-me-nots, with a “Pansy Blue”butterfly.

Batik by Marina Elphick, Uk artist specialising in batik art.

Bluebells and Iris detail.

Batik by Marina Elphick, Uk artist specialising in batik art.

Detail of iris’ and butterfly.

batik artist Marina Elphick works with great detail and realism on portrait and other figurative themes.

Detail of butterflies and Ceplok motifs.

Butterflies have been and are known in many cultures and civilisations to symbolise the soul or psyche, (the Ancient Greek word for butterfly).

Native American Indians see butterflies as the souls of ancestors, lasting symbols of hope and joy, renewal and freedom.

The butterfly is also linked to the theme of rebirth, metamorphosis and new life.

For me the butterfly is about love, vulnerability, creativity and transition. They are perfect visual tools to express a spirituality that I can relate to.

Batik by Marina Elphick, artist specialising in batik art and portraiture.

Detail of butterflies and monkshood flowers from the portrait of Tania.

These ideas and the imagery they evoked in my mind, formed the composition around Tania. It is not a background but a design which envelopes her in love, peace and spiritual flight.

 

Batik in progress, a portrait of the artist's sister.

Tania batik in progress, 10 of the 15 steps showing drawing, waxing and various dye stages.

Batik at early stage by Marina Elphick.

Pencil drawn batik on cotton, with second and third waxing and two flesh dye tones.

Marina Elphick making a batik portrait in her Sussex studio, UK.

At work on the early stages of Tania’s portrait.

Batik at early stage by Marina Elphick, a recognised contemporary batik artist from the UK.

Batik after bleaching ready for more dyes.

Batik at early stage by Marina Elphick, a recognised contemporary batik artist from the UK.

Batik with Turquoise and yellow over dyes. It is now ready for 8th waxing.

Batik mid way, by Marina Elphick, a recognised contemporary batik artist from the UK.

Tania batik after 9th waxing.

Batik in progress by Marina Elphick, a recognised contemporary batik artist from the UK.

Batik after immersion in deep blue dye.

Batik in progress by Marina Elphick, a recognised contemporary batik artist from the UK.

Portrait after 10th and 11th waxing.

Batik in progress by Marina Elphick, a recognised contemporary batik artist from the UK.

Batik in final violet dye bath. I melted out any cracks in the wax on Tania’s face before hand.

Batik by Marina Elphick, a recognised contemporary batik artist from the UK, specialising in Portraits.

Tania, finished portrait, batik by Marina Elphick.

Batik by Marina Elphick, a recognised contemporary batik artist from the UK, specialising in Portraiture.

Close up detail of Tania, batik by Marina Elphick.

Batik. Contemporary Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK figurative batik artist.

Batik by Marina

Past and Present
I will be exhibiting new batik art work at the 2014 September Art Exhibition, Wadhurst, East Sussex.
Batik by Marina Elphick, showing at the September Exhibition 2014

Batik. Contemporary Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK figurative batik artist.

Fire Flower, batik on paper on show at The September Exhibition.

The September Art Exhibition was established in 1996. From modest beginnings the show has grown to become an important and eagerly awaited event in the art calendar year. Operating on a non-profit making basis the exhibition is open to all and was established by artists seeking to create an accessible and varied show, it achieves high visitor numbers and has an excellent reputation with consistently strong sales. It is a friendly, professional and enjoyable event.

Open Friday 5th September – Sunday 14th September. Opening times: 10am – 8pm daily (Sunday 14th September 10am – 4pm), private view Thursday 4th September 6 – 9 pm.
http://www.septemberart.org/

Batik. Contemporary Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK figurative batik artist.

Batik portrait of Amy, with woodland valley landscape, 88 x 83cm, by Marina. This will be on show at my open studio exhibition, 6th & 7th sept.

Batik. Contemporary Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK figurative batik artist.

Sundance, batik on paper by Marina Elphick. This will be on show at the September Exhibition.

Batik. Contemporary Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK figurative batik artist.

Butterfly on blue, batik on cotton by Marina Elphick. This batik will be showing at the September exhibition.

Batik. Contemporary Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK figurative batik artist.

Furnace, batik on paper by Marina Elphick.

Batik. Contemporary Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK figurative batik artist.

Leaf fall, batik on paper by Marina Elphick, showing at September Exhibition.

Coinciding with the September Exhibition, Crowborough Arts Open Studios

My studio will be open for the weekend of 6th – 7th September and by appointment until Wednesday 10th Sept as part of Crowborough Arts Open Studios.

Batik. Contemporary batik artist Marina Elphick.

Marina’s studio with batik on the go.

Batik. Contemporary Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK figurative batik artist.

Lupins and Poppies batik on paper, by Marina Elphick. This work on show at Open Studio exhibition, see details below.

An exhibition of my work will be on show in my Studio and stable Gallery where I will be demonstrating the art of batik and all the processes involved in this unique and ancient Indonesian art form. Many of the artworks are for sale, including prints and batik greeting cards.
Parking and wheelchair access friendly, refreshments available.

Marina Elphick, batik artist specialising in figurative work and portraiture in batik.

Working on latest batik in my studio.

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Batik. Contemporary Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK figurative batik artist.

English Rose, batik portrait of Amy, on show at my open studio exhibition.

Batik. Contemporary Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK figurative batik artist.

Bonnie and Clyde, batik portrait of tabby cats in their garden by Marina Elphick.

Batik. Contemporary Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK figurative batik artist.

Sirens, life size batik on cotton, by Marina Elphick 122cm x 228 cm, showing at my Open Studio Exhibition.

Batik. Contemporary batik by Marina Elphick, UK figurative artist.

Profusion, batik on paper by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik with cat by UK batik artist Marina Elphick, specialist at batik portraiture and other figurative artwork.

Floral batik Art

Floral detail of batik by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik, portraits, fora and fauna. Flowers in batik.

Cyclamen and ivy, detail from Winter, batik by Marina Elphick. Flowers in art.

Alongside portraiture, flowers feature in my artwork regularly, whether in a portrait or still life, or as a batik floral painting.

Exotic Flowers in home made vase, batik art by Marina Elphick, Uk artist and batik specialist. Flowers in batik.

Exotic Bouquet in home made vase, batik art work by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik art by UK artist Marina Elphick. Flowers in batik are popular, portraits in batik can be commissioned.

Hyacinths with Willow Coffee pot, batik art by Marina Elphick.

With their intense colours, natural perfection and delicate range of textures and shapes, flowers give me great pleasure and inspire the designer in me. In some of my work the vase features as a focal point, in later batiks I concentrate on the flowers in a more natural state or as specimens.

Floral batik art by Marina Elphick. Still life with flowers in batik. Artist specialises in batik portraits. Batik flowers.

Lilies and Iris on Orange, batik art work by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik by UK artist Marina Elphick. Flowers feature in many of Marina's batik portraits. Flower batik

Anemones in blue and white vase, floral batik art work by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik painting by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik portraits, flora and fauna. flowers in batik.

Lilies and Iris in hand made vase, floral batik art work on cotton.

Freesias, batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik. Flower often feature in Marina's batik portraits as symbolism.

Freesias, batik by Marina Elphick.

The natural beauty and range of delicate floral structures present endless design potential and drawing challenges, so I am regularly drawn to them as batik subject matter.

Floral batik painting by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik portraits, flora and fauna. Flowers in batik. Batik art by Marina.

Ranunculus in shades of red to orange, floral batik on cotton by Marina Elphick.

Flowers can hold symbolic meaning and I have often used them in my batik portraits to emphasise a mood or something about the character or experience of the sitter. They can help tell a story as well as making the composition more interesting and colourful visually.

Floral detail of batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik, portraits, flora and fauna.

Rose hips, detail from Autumn, a batik by Marina Elphick.

Floral detail of batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik portraits. flower batiks.

Detail of roses from a batik portrait by Marina Elphick.

Floral detail of batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik, portraits, flora and fauna.

Snow drops, detail from batik portrait of Amanda and Lucy, by Marina Elphick.

Floral detail of batik by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik, portraits, fora and fauna.

Blossom and cyclamen, detail from a batik portrait of Amanda and Lucy.

Floral detail of batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik portraits, flora and fauna. Batik flowers.

Rose detail from a batik portrait, by Marina Elphick.

Floral detail of batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik, portraits, flora and fauna. Batik flower..

Poppies and seed heads, detail of batik portrait by Marina.

Floral detail of batik by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik portraits, fora and fauna. Batik flowers.

Detail of poppy and chrysanthemums, from a Portrait of Nicole. Batik by Marina Elphick.

Floral detail of batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik portraits, flora and fauna. Batik flowers.

Lanterns and blackberries , detail from Autumn. Batik art by Marina Elphick.

Floral detail of batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik portraits, flora and fauna, batik flowers.

Cosmos, daisies and roses, detail from portrait of Bobby, batik .

Floral batik painting by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik portraits, flora and fauna.Parang flowers batik art.

Flower detail from ” Butterfly on blue “, batik art work by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik painting by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik portraits, flora and fauna. Batik art Flowers..

Anemones with Chinese screen, batik art work by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik , portraits, flora and fauna, batik flowers.

Detail of Iris’ from batik portrait on paper, by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik art painting by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik , portraits, flora and fauna, batik flowers.

Lupins, from a batik portrait by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik painting on cotton by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik, portraits, flora and fauna. Batik flowers.

Lilies and Poppy seed heads, batik art by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik portraits, flora and fauna.Batik flowers.

Bird of paradise, early floral batik by Marina Elphick.

Cornflowers, batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik. Batik flowers.

Cornflowers in Blue glass vase, batik by Marina Elphick.

Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik. Flowers in batik.

Anemones and black teapot, batik by Marina Elphick.

Poppy Garden by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik. Flowers in batik.

Poppy Garden 1, batik by Marina Elphick.

Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik. Flowers in batik art.

Poppy Garden 2, batik art work by Marina Elphick.

Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik. Flowers in batik art.

Cerise anemones, batik art work by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik art by painter Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik. Batik flowers.

Fire tulips, batik by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik painting by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik portraits, flora and fauna. Batik Art. Flowers in art.

Purple Tulips in green vase, batik by Marina Elphick.

Sweet peas, batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik. Batik flowers, flowers in art.

Sweet peas on the Window sill, batik by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik art, by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik. Batik flowers.

Ranunculus on blue, batik by Marina Elphick.

Batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik. Flowers in batik art.

Purple Ranunculus, batik by Marina Elphick.

Tulips, batik art by Marina Elphick, UK artist specialising in batik. Flowers in art, batik flower painting.

Red Tulips, batik art work by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik by UK artist Marina Elphick. Batik art.

Anemones with Phoenix screen, batik art by Marina Elphick.

Floral batik artwork by UK batik artist Marina Elphick, specialist at batik portraiture and other figurative artwork. Flowers in batik.

White Cat and Anemones, batik by Marina Elphick.